Open access journals and integrative open publication platforms seeking to disseminate open research as quickly and transparently as possible and without paywalls are being launched across fields as far apart as microbiology and health to global social challenges. Check out the latest contributions made by our Research Outputs Team to the Research and Innovation Hub.

It is frustrating that we are only able to share our vast electronic resource collections with our current staff and students. Still, you can read many of the cutting edge articles and ebooks coming out of academia. Many are made freely available to everyone under an open access license while others are available through the public libraries’ Access to research scheme.

Modern music is pretty much all synthesised, or at least comprises digital reproductions of recordings of acoustic sounds and yet this development was very much a twentieth-century phenomenon. This post comprises a whistlestop tour from early electric light bulbs through vacuum tubes to modern electronic circuitry, Oscar, Sala, Brian Eno, the too often overlooked Wendy Carlos, and on to the modern day with many a window shopping stop along the way.

Looking for open-access publications, journals, research articles, monographs and theses that you can read for free online? The British Library has now brought together the major open access repositories in one place to help you discover scholarly publications and resources that are freely available to all, wherever you are.

We now have access to 50 new databases from ProQuest for a whole year, until July 2023. We chose the databases on this list with care and hope you will find them useful. Once this year-long trial is up, we have to choose which ones to keep in perpetuity (up to the cost of our deposit).

Now you can always know how many computers are available in the library at any given time.

We’ve added a handy new tool to the library homepage that displays the number of available PCs and laptops. Drawn from near real-time usage data, this little display gives you a good idea of just how busy the library is at any particular time and might help you decide whether it is worth carrying in your own laptop or finding a library desktop or laptop to use or borrow.

More and more of you prefer your own powerful tech to the existing library PCs, which while they are replaced regularly quickly pale in comparison with the breakneck pace of laptop and even tablet development in general. That’s why we are trialling large, curved screen displays, full-size keyboards and mice just waiting for you to plug in your device (or at a push, one of our loanable laptops) and play. Scan the QR code taped to the table beside these devices and let us know what you think and if you would like to see more of these elsewhere on campus.