Reading for pleasure for just 30 minutes a week is associated with many benefits, from increased life satisfaction, self-esteem, better sleep, creativity, and happiness to improved social skills. It helps us rediscover all of who we are as we recognise feelings and situations faced by characters, reminding us of our common humanity and helping us remember and reconnect to all that we are and not just those aspects of ourselves we feel reduced to by the doubts and anxieties of the moment. So where can you most easily find things to read for pleasure?

While TikTokkers sleep in a giant dog bed, I guess that leaves their old bed for the dog to sleep in.

After months of careful planning, two young men apparently decided that dog beds were better designed than beds for people, and that no-one would object to a dog beds large enough for fully grown men to be introduced into the average shared office. That, at least, appears to the premise behind the “Plfufl”. This blogger weeps for humanity.

One of the secrets to a successful life is developing the practice of asking of each thing, “Is this important? What would happen if I did not do it?”. This practice is the single biggest secret to making the best use of your time. It enables you to prioritise your life meaningfully by stopping doing those things that make little or no difference and focusing on those things that will. It declutters life and protects against that ever present threat of becoming overwhelmed.

Asking the same question over and over again. It’s not called getting old, it’s called getting ill. Dementia affects people of all ages, from childhood to old age, but it is possible to live well with dementia. What makes the difference is people like you and me knowing how to make the world more friendly for people with dementia. So why not sign up to become a Dementia Friend today?

Just as resting your eyelids makes you feel sleepy, opening your eyes wide and looking upwards sends signals from the muscles around your eyes to your brain telling it to wake up, making you feel almost instantly energised. Like most behavioural techniques, it sounds laughably simple but works almost instantly like some kind of black magic.

The University supports the Sunflower lanyard scheme that allows anyone with a hidden disability, including cognitive differences that under some circumstances present communication difficulties, to signal discreetly to others that they might need a little more time or assistance. The Library is proud to join this scheme and you can now pick up your sunflower lanyard from the Library.

Talking things out with your friends and coursemates can really help but sometimes there are things troubling you that you don’t want to talk to your friends about or you find yourself surrounded by people who want to offer you well-meaning advice but who don’t seem to really listen to you. That’s when you might want to reach out for some extra support.

The uniformity of instruction you probably received in school concealed the important truth that everyone learns differently and that you need to experiment, try new ways of working, and decide there and then whether they feel good or bad or if you are unsure. There are now many tools that can help you learn in new and creative ways and library staff can provide specific support for anyone who has difficulty engaging with text-based resources to learn more easily.