Are the organisers behind shadow libraries today's Robin Hoods?

Behind every great economy lurks a shadow economy offering what the regulated economy cannot and libraries are no exception. For every library buying ebooks and subscribing to ejournals and full-text databases, there is a shadow library attempting to provide the same resources for free without paying.

Seen by some as modern day Robin Hoods, could these shadow libraries be about to bring down unintended and far-reaching consequences upon us all?

You can now get an AI artist to create fantasy artwork on demand. While this is a boon for creating a huge volume of new artworks for use in the publishing industry, including the cottage industry of writing fantasy content from novellas to roleplaying adventures without having to pay steep royalties to the artists who created the art, this somewhat unexpected development (unexpected for anyone who like me thought AI was years away from emulating human creativity) means that any artist can have their distinctive art style they have spent half a lifetime creating emulated in minutes by a computer programme. Such AIs can spin off thousands of original works in the style of an existing artist they have studied. This begs the question, can and how will copyright law protect creatives from having their work emulated? As yet, the law seems able and willing but the details are still missing.

What could creatives and academics learn about from clown eggs?  Quite a lot, it turns out… Read this engaging blog post from the Scholarly Kitchen about how registering copyright works might make it easier to identify copyright owners, seek permission …

From copyright to clown eggs (and back again) Read more »

Here’s something to make your weekend.  Our year of free art continues, with the British Library following the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art in releasing millions of images free for anyone to use online under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) …

Releasing the world’s art into the wild Read more »

Copyright is an ever changing leviathan lurking beneath the glossy surface of the internet waiting to ensnare the unwary and the incautious.  Facet Publishing has posted a series of blog posts recently looking at tips for lecturers and students, recent changes to copyright …

Copying something you found online? Read more »

One of New York’s most prestigious art galleries, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has begun to share 375,000 images of its artworks under a Creative Commons CC0 license, effectively waiving all copyright restrictions and making these images available for anyone to copy, …

New York Met releases art images into the public domain Read more »

If you make scanned extracts from books, journals or magazines, or taken text or still images from works published in electronic format available to students, for example through Moodle, then you are required to report the copies you have made. We strongly …

Scanning for Moodle? Ask your Library to do it for you! Read more »